Why are hemp hearts healthy for dogs?

Nutrition
March 30, 2021

Hemp hearts have been a trendy food in the human world for awhile now and have also begun making a transition over into pet food as well. But what are hemp hearts and is there actually any nutritional benefit to them?

What are hemp hearts?

Hemp hearts are technically classified as a seed. They originally found as a fibrous pod however, the part that is usually eaten is the soft, chewy inner part of the dehulled seed. Originating from Central Asian, hemp hearts have been consumed by humans for thousands of years for their nutritional benefits.

Dog puts his face on man's knees and smiling from the hands scratching her ear cute dog put his face on his knees to the man and smiling from the hands scratching her ear

What are the nutritional benefits of hemp hearts?

  1. They help reduce inflammation

Hemp hearts are loaded with protective compounds called omega 3 fatty acids. Omega 3s help reduce and repair damage caused by inflammatory agents called free radicals. As a result, hemp hearts are considered to be cardioprotective and promote healthy heart function. Check out a more in depth analysis of omega 3s on our main Kabo blog!

  1. They help reduce blood sugar

Hemp hearts contain a moderate amount of fibre. This means that hemp hearts are relatively low in available sugars. Fibre helps to reduce spikes in blood sugar and glycemic index. In turn, helping to reduce the risk of diabetes.

Hemp hearts also have a good dose of magnesium. Magnesium helps to break down sugars, keeping cells from becoming insulin resistant.

  1. They help improve skin and coat health

Omega 3s in hemp hearts may help to promote healthy skin and a shiny coat. This is a result of fatty acids balancing the immune system.

Tibetan terrier wind blowing in fur

  1. They are a good source of plant protein

Hemp hearts contain a healthy dose of protein (approximately 0.3g protein/gram) and is considered a complete protein. A complete protein is any protein source that contains all essential amino acids required for life. This is rare for plant proteins as many are deficient in at least one or more amino acid.

Also rare is the high proportion of digestible protein in hemp hearts. This means that the protein in hemp hearts is easily broken down and absorbed in the digestive tract, instead of it just being excreted like a lot of other plant protein.

  1. They help keep dogs full

As previously mentioned, hemp hearts are a great source of fibre. Fibre is a nutrient that is slowly digested. This means that it sticks around in the digestive tract for longer than other nutrients. Since fibre stays in the digestive tract for longer, it keeps dogs feeling full and satisfied.

This fibre also helps to promote the digestion of other nutrients. Fibre is a food source for the bacteria in the gut. The bacteria use the fibre to ferment and break down other nutrients in the intestines.

Golden Retriever eating dog food inside metal bowl on kitchen floor

What is the nutritive value of hemp hearts?

Below is an overview of the nutritional values of hemp hearts, determined by the FDA.

The information provided is per 100 grams of hemp hearts.

A more detailed nutrition description can be found on the FDA website.

Does Kabo use hemp hearts?

Yes! Kabo Monch Bars contain 10 grams of hemp hearts per 100 grams. We include hemp hearts in our Monch bars as a healthy boost of fibre and protein for doggies living their best adventurous life.

References

Very well fit. "Hemp Hearts Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits" (2020). https://www.verywellfit.com/hemp-hearts-nutrition-facts-4585190#citation-1

Healthline. "6 Evidence-Based Health Benefits of Hemp Seeds". (2020). https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6-health-benefits-of-hemp-seeds

FDA. "Food data central; hemp seeds , dehulled" (2019). https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/170148/nutrients

Schultz, Carolyn J., Wai L. Lim, Shi F. Khor, Kylie A. Neumann, Jakob M. Schulz, Omid Ansari, Mark A. Skewes, and Rachel A. Burton. "Journal of Agriculture and Food Research."

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